Sweeping out the ashes: treatment, removal part of plan to combat emerald ash borer


New Brighton has been designated a “Tree City USA” for 36 consecutive years by the Arbor Day Foundation. This means that, among other things, it has a community tree ordinance and spends at least $2 per capita on urban forestry. (courtesy of City of New Brighton)

New Brighton Parks and Recreation staff on May 6 removed 20 ash trees from the Silver Lake Road median, replacing them with 10 trees of more desirable varieties. 

It was determined that the ashes had been planted too close together, which would negatively impact their long-term health. Additionally, the city has an emerald ash borer plan in place, which includes treatment and removal of ash trees as tools to help maintain the long-term health of New Brighton’s flora.

While the city saw a noticeable spike in borer-infected ash in 2018, all impacted trees were either privately owned or in a Minnesota Department of Transportation right of way, leaving the city few options. 

In order to curb the spread of emerald ash borer on private property, the city has put standards in place that ensure homeowners can have their trees treated by an experienced contractor at a fair rate. 

According to Jennifer Fink, director of Parks and Recreation, each contractor has been in the business for more than five years, and has agreed to charge no more than $7 per diameter inch. More information on treatment services can be found at www.newbrightonmn.gov.

Symptoms of emerald ash borer include canopy thinning, new growth at the base of the tree, extensive woodpecker damage and, more specifically, small D-shaped exit holes made by adult borers. Often, S-shaped patterns and larvae can be seen underneath splitting bark. The invasive beetle originated in northeast Asia.

If residents believe one of their trees may be infected, they’re encouraged to contact Jim Veiman, park maintenance worker and forester, at 651-638-2065.

 

–Bridget Kranz can be reached at bkranz@lillienews.com or 651-748-7825.

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